Vermonter to Protest White Nationalist Rally in Boston This Weekend

BURLINGTON, Vt. - Saturday, a white nationalist demonstration is taking place at the Boston Common.

The Boston rally will come one week after violence in Charlottesville, Virginia; it's where a white supremacist rally turned deadly as marchers clashed with counter-protesters.

Emma Shoenberg is one Vermonter planning to counter-protest a free-speech rally in Boston this weekend, which is being called a Free Speech Rally.

"That's a clever name. It's actually a hate speech rally. And we know that a mobilization of white supremacists and nazis to come and be violent," said Shoenberg.

The 25 year-old Jewish woman is nervous to attend, but hopes to bring a positive force at the Boston Common.

"So what we're doing is we're literally putting our bodies in the street. This is a moment where the resistance isn't just sharing a Facebook post, you know talking about Black Lives Matter, but actually showing up," said Shoenberg.

Ahead of this weekend's rally, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh put out a warning to hate groups saying they aren't welcome in the city.

"We are a better people than what we're seeing on TV. And I'm asking people when you come into Boston, respect this city. Because we respect your right to come in and speak," said Walsh.

Governor Phil Scott issued a statement by video Thursday saying Vermont must stand up against racism and bigotry.

"America has always been a beacon of hope. Let's continue to blaze that trail and uphold our values.//And this 'brave little state' will continue to show the courage to do so," said Scott.

Shoenberg hopes after Saturday's rally, she can continue her work in Vermont.

"Just because you're in a big city like Boston and I'm in a small town like Montpelier, Vermont or Burlington, it doesn't mean that we can ignore those issues, and we can say 'that's away, that's not here.' You know, I'm gonna bring this home and continue the fight and keep talking about this," said Shoenberg.

Thursday, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed a resolution and proclamation denouncing neo-nazism and white nationalism.

A copy of that resolution will be sent to Charlottesville's mayor, Virginia's governor and President Donald Trump.


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