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After 187 Years Burlington Free Press Moves To New Home

For more than 180 years The Burlington Free Press has been a downtown institution on College Street. But as of Monday the newspaper has a new home just a few blocks away.

BURLINGTON, Vt. -For more than 180 years The Burlington Free Press has been a downtown institution on College Street.
But as of Monday the newspaper has a new home just a few blocks away.

“It is an exciting time - even for an old guy like me,” joked Mike Donoghue, a longtime reporter for the Free Press.
Donoghue has spent more than half his life working as a reporter for the Burlington Free Press.
“I’ve been coming up the stairs an awful long time a number of times. I think we tried to figure it out- over 20,000 times up the stairs and 20,000 down too,” said Donoghue.
But Monday he walked down the stairs for the last time in the College Street office as the paper officially makes the move to its new location just a few blocks away.
“I'm pretty well settled in; I’d forgotten a couple things that didn't get moved so I came over here to grab them,” said Donoghue.
Over the years the Free Press bought 12 buildings, piecing them together to make one home.
But Jim Fogler the President and Publisher says it wasn't always the best layout - logistically.
Fogler says this new location provides a much better space.
“It's amazing to be altogether on one floor,” said Fogler.
Sort of  - some employees will still print the paper back at the old location.
“We moved 60% of our employee’s here- at 100 Bank. And the rest of our employees remain on South Winooski Street where we invested $2.4 million dollars and the press,” said Fogler.
Sam Hemingway has worked at the paper for almost as long as Donoghue.
“There's a lot of history in this building. There’s a lot of legends in this building there's a lot of secrets the building has just by being here and being a newspaper for so long,” said Hemingway.
He says after 36 years moving is bittersweet.
“It’s exciting to be over there- it’s a dramatically beautiful place. I don’t think it changes what we do; it just changes where we do it,” said Hemingway.
The Free Press sold seven of its 12 buildings to The Great Cedars LLC, a company formed by the Handy family for $2.8 million dollars back in September.
The remaining five buildings still belong to the paper and will continue to function as the printing and distribution center.


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