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Flooding Ravages Roads, Crews Can't Do Much To Help

Mud season is here, and flooding has already started to close roads.
BRANDON, Vt. - Mud season is here, and flooding has already started to close roads.

Leland and Alison Prival drive over Long Swamp Road every day to get from their home in Sudbury to their ballet studio in Brandon. Monday, they struggled as warmer temperatures and melting snow brought the swamp spilling over into the roads, which are already riddled with potholes.

"There is no spot where there isn't a pothole," said Alison. The potholes are filled with water now, making it hard for drivers to see how deep they are.

"We just don't want the tires to pop, and then we don't want to be walking Long Swamp, in the swamp, to get help," Alison said.

The waters overcame culverts and flooded Damien Guillemette's driveway, who has lived on Long Swamp Road his entire life. He says it hasn't been this bad in years.

"The water started getting bigger and bigger...it's making it harder to get out of the house and onto the road," he said.

Conspicuously absent were any crews working on the roads.

"Why don't they do something?" asked Leland Prival. "Why doesn't the city do something? How can they do this to the people who live here that have to drive in the town?"

Turns out, the Director of Public Works Brian Sanderson had to send the crews home after they worked all night. Brandon, like most towns, has to tighten the purse strings after a rough winter.

"We were definitely well over our overtime budget," Sanderson said. "So in order for me to manage that I'm trying to work them into an 8-hour day."

Plus, Sanderson says they can't fix the roads until the water dries up.

"Once the water is able to recede off the roads, and the roads dry up some, then we can go in and look at doing some long-term fixing as far as grading to get rid of the potholes," he said.

In the meantime the Privals will have muddle through spring, and drive slow.
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