Norwich Competes in Solar Competition

Norwich Competes in Solar Competition

Norwich University and Middlebury College are both representing Vermont in a national competition. It challenges students to design and build solar powered homes.
This week Vermont was named a leader in solar technology. Now two colleges in the Green Mountain State are competing in a national solar expo.

Norwich University and Middlebury College are both representing Vermont in this national competition. It challenges students to design and build solar powered homes. Today Northfield said "so long solar house" in a public send-off.

Electric meters rarely run backwards, unless your house is totally powered by the sun.

Norwich University students spent two-years designing, and then building, their solar-powered home.

Caleb Burrington, a student who worked on the house, says "the biggest thing is the student design. The lights, the shades- everything was fabricated in-house from raw materials."

The home, dubbed Delta T-90, is part of the 2013 Solar Decathlon, a US Department of Energy program designed to drive solar innovation among students.

The Norwich team focused on affordability. The 1,000 square foot, two bedroom home costs less than $200,000.

Shannon Sickler, another Norwich student who worked on the house said, "it still feels very open with the high ceilings and open floor plan. It feels like you have a lot of livable space in this house."

Seventy-two ultra thin solar panels line the roof. Designers did account for it being snow-covered three months a year, which will happen in Vermont.

If the house produces more energy than it uses, the power company provides a credit.

The competition will take place in California. That's right- the whole house will be moved, and re-built, 3,000 miles away.

Judges will choose a winner in October, but regardless of who wins students say this is a terrific experience.

Sickler says, "it is a huge boost for the university to be able to say and prove that we can accomplish a project on this scale for such a small school with the interdisciplinary nature of our programs."

You can follow the team's progress on their Facebook page.


Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus