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Snow Clears, Drops 6-10" For Many

Here's how much snow we received, up to 15" in the mountains!
2/4-5, 2014 (Fox44)
2/4-5, 2014 (Fox44)
As of 7 a.m. Feb 6 (Fox44)
As of 7 a.m. Feb 6 (Fox44)
Courtesy NWS (Fox44)
Courtesy NWS (Fox44)
Widespread snow dropped a half foot to one foot of snow across northern New England and New York Wednesday.

Some, but not all, of the snow reports can be found (graphically) above. For a full list of towns closest to you and how much snow they received, go to the links below (The National Weather Service).

Vermont and northern New York:
http://forecast.weather.gov/product.php?site=BTV&product=PNS&issuedby=BTV

Bennington/Windham counties in Vermont and central New York:
http://forecast.weather.gov/product.php?site=ALY&product=PNS&issuedby=ALY

New Hampshire and Maine:
http://forecast.weather.gov/product.php?site=GYX&product=PNS&issuedby=GYX

The snow had a low density, meaning it feel as light, fluffy flakes. There were snow ratios in the Plattsburgh-Burlington area of 17:1 to 18:1. That means 17" of snow = 1" of liquid. An average snow event yields about 10-12:1. With a higher ratio, snow accumulations can add up more quickly and to higher amounts.

The northern Champlain Valley and surrounding areas (farther north) received more than what I honestly anticipated. That's because there were bands of snow that set up and slowly trudged through these areas. Snow bands are very tough to forecast, because they are usually 10-40 miles wide and long, meaning weather models have a very tough time predicting these, pointing these out, and they're similar to thunderstorms where it is tough for us to forecast where the bands set up. That's why we give a range in snow total forecast, to attribute the different terrain but also the possibility of heavier snow bursts or lighter snow lulls.

The snowfall brings the Burlington area closer to average this season. Including this most recent snow event, here are the Burlington area's snow update:
Through February 5, 2014: 44.3"
Average through that date: 47.4"
Last year through that date: 49.8"

There is a higher snow potential for early February, as the weather pattern has shifted from January into a more progressive setup, yielding storms coming into California to give the drought-stricken area some possible rain, but maybe tapping into colder air when it arrives here to be snow. Although forecasting separate storms for the rest of this month is almost impossible to do :)

-Meteorologist Steve Glazier
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