68°F

VT State College Students To See 3% Tuition Hike In 2014-15

VSC Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition and fees by 3% for 1 year.
JOHNSON, Vt. -

In-state Vermont state college undergrads will be seeing a bigger tuition bill next fall. After years of increases, some trustees wanted it to stop.

“It's hard for people to pay for school when they want to increase the price,” said Johnson State College Student Liliane Kouadio. “Years from now, after we're done with college, we still have to find a job and that will add more money to the loans that we're taking."

That's why some Vermont State College Trustees wanted to end proposed tuition increases.

The Board met on Thursday at Johnson State College to vote on next fall's tuition rate.

In-state students at Johnson State already pay over $9,000 a year for tuition, not including room and board.

What was proposed was a 3% increase for tuition and fees for the next 2 academic years.

The schools affected are Castleton State, CCV, Johnson State, Lyndon State, Vermont Technical College.

“We cannot afford the 0. We have to go with what the Presidents recommend,” said Martha O’Connor, Vermont State College Board of Trustees. “We have expenses that we have to keep up. We have buildings. And we have to maintain the quality of the education at these state colleges."

What ended up happening was a bit of a compromise.

Five trustees voted to freeze tuition altogether. That did not pass.

Instead, a 3% increase was approved but for only 1 year.

Now, Martha O'Connor, Chair of the Vermont State College Finance & Facilities Committee, says that as early as next week, she'll start meeting with people to find funding that doesn't come from students.

“We have to start now, talking to the Governor talking to the legislature to get more funding. We have to take the burden of tuition off the student,” said O’Connor.

Vermont state colleges have been seeing similar increases for years. This 3% increase is down from 4 over the past 2 years.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

Local Headlines