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Milton High School Needs $5.9 Million for Repairs

Milton High School officials are pleading for help from voters. The school has mold, asbestos and much of it is not handicapped accessible. The district is asking its residents for about six million dollars to fix it.
Milton High School officials are pleading for help from voters.

The school has mold, asbestos and much of it is not handicapped accessible.

The district is asking its residents for about six million dollars to fix it.

A special election will be on December 3rd.

We got a look inside of the school.

There are a lot of people who see the need, but others think the price tag is too high.

Milton High School was built in 1969, and the bones of the building haven't been touched since. Its age is starting to show.

Cheryl Alwine's three sons were students there.

"The ladies bathroom in the cafeteria is an embarrassment," Alwine said.

Mold in the walls, asbestos in the floor, leaks in the roof. These are just some of the reasons the Milton School District is asking residents to vote yes in December for a 20 year, $5.9 million dollar bond.

 If voters approve the tax hike, the cafeteria, bathrooms, and locker rooms will be re-done. Anything that can be re-used, like kitchen appliances will stay.

"I know there's work that needs to be done, but I’m not sure it needs to be quite that much," Alwine added.

The way things are now, a student with a disability isn't able to get through the lunch line, or into the P.E. locker rooms. The only way in, is up a flight of stairs.

Another change the bond would bring about is making the boys and girls locker rooms the same size.

The boys was made to be much larger, back in 1969.

"I think I’d rather put the time and effort in books and stuff, to educate the kids than to worry about where they're going to be putting their clothes," Lionel Mathieu said.

Opponents voted down a ten million dollar bond on Town Meeting Day this past March.

"This year, it’s wall lockers and cafeteria, next year, it'll be something else," Mathieu said.

The school scaled back, and hopes voters will agree to nearly $6 million dollars.

School leaders say that would bring everything up to code.

There is a general election in March, but members of the school board say the vote has to take place in December to allow time for the bid process if it passes, so that construction can start as soon as kids are out for the summer.

 A special election will cost the district about $2,000.

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