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School Leaders And Law Enforcement Team Up To Keep Kids Safe

More than 300 school administrators and first responders gathered at the Sheraton in Burlington Wednesday for the first Statewide School Safety Training Conference.
BURLINGTON, Vt.- How safe are your kids at school?  Educators say an effective emergency plan is key during school hours.
As we saw last week in Winooski a plan for after school is equally important.
 
To enter Colchester High School first you have to ring the buzzer. The doors are then unlocked from inside the school.
“We've put a lot of protocols and processes in place as to what would we do in an emergency situation, safety drills, and so on,” said Tim Emery, Colchester High School Assistant Principal.
But last week’s incident in Winooski has school leaders all over the state re-evaluating their emergency plans.
 “We have a pretty good system during the day- but what about in the evenings,” said Emery.
More than 300 school administrators and first responders gathered at the Sheraton in Burlington Wednesday for the first Statewide School Safety Training Conference.
“We are all in the same business, we just have different responsibilities. And we all want to keep them safe so the whole relationship between law enforcement and schools is really important,” said Emery.
Speakers focused on safety protocols and how to better implement changes state wide.
The goal is to create a better 'blue print' for communities to follow in emergency situations.
“There are some basic and some fundamental tasks and goals that we want to accomplish it does need to have an effect at the community level,” said Keith Flynn, Commissioner of the Department of Public Safety.
“In some of the rural schools you really are on your own for at least ten minutes when you call for first responders,” said Armando Vilaseca, Secretary of Education.
That issue was also addressed at the conference. With no perfect fit for all communities state leaders say each school will have to take the states recommendations, and customize them to meet their specific needs.
“There is no cookie cutter fix,” said Flynn.

Governor Peter Shumlin spoke briefly at the conference. He stressed the importance of team work between school leaders and local law enforcement agencies to create a plan to keep students safe.


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