February storm brings varied snow totals across state, plows came prepared

Local News

Across the State, Vermonters are experiencing a snowy start to February. But despite the cold, wind, snow totals of more than a foot in some areas, the Vermont Agency of Transportation says these conditions are common this time of the year.

Maintenance Director Todd Law with the Vermont Agency of Transportation said when it came to storm readiness, staff started as early as Monday afternoon.

“This has been a very persistent storm, especially in certain areas. It led up quite a bit. We thought we had a reprieve for a while but it reared back up,” said Law.

Vermont transportation members reported slippery conditions in north Tuesday afternoon, and a few crashes and slide-offs. However, Captain Lance Burnham with Vermont State Police says they saw fewer accidents than expected.

Law said the storm intensified quickly at times, making it harder to salt the roads.

“The more moisture in the air, the more salt it takes to melt things off,” said Law.

But these conditions are not out of the ordinary for Vermont in February. Still, members came to work prepared. 

“Tomorrow will have half crew coming in to tend to the roads and to push back areas where we had some accumulated snow,” said Zach Blodgett, Manager and Engineer for Montpelier Public Works.

Blodgett says snow plows were on the road in the capital city by 4 o’clock Tuesday morning. The focus now is on a safe Wednesday morning commute. 

“Give enough space between you and the cars around you and don’t make any aggressive movements. All those things are important to being safe, especially if you have to go out.” 

Law says one of the most important snow safety tips to practice is doing a thorough clean of your windshield and windows before heading out on the roads.

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