WHAT ARE THE MAJOR RACES?

Democratic state Senate President Pro Tempore Becca Balint is the leading candidate in the race for Vermont’s lone seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. Democratic U.S. Rep. Peter Welch is the leading candidate to succeed retiring U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy. In the governor’s race, Republican incumbent Gov. Phil Scott is seeking a fourth term.

Vermonters will also vote on whether to amend the state constitution to guarantee abortion rights.

Polls close at 7 p.m. in Vermont.

HOW DO VERMONTERS VOTE?
There are some 500,000 registered voters in Vermont, with about 445,000 of them active. Vermonters can check their registration status on the My Voter Page.

Early and absentee voting is open to everyone and began in August. All active Vermont voters have been sent a general election ballot. Ballots can be returned to the town clerk’s office on the day before the election or to the polling place before 7 p.m. on November 8.

Voters may also deposit their ballot into a drop box or bring them in person to their hometown or clerk’s office. Voters can mail their ballots with the recommendation they are sent by Oct. 31 to ensure they are received in time.

WHAT’S CHANGED SINCE THE PANDEMIC ELECTION OF 2020?
The state is using essentially the same electoral system in 2022 that was in place for the 2020 election. It includes a system that now allows voters to “cure” defective ballots, such as when voters don’t properly follow the proper procedures. The voter is notified by the town or city clerk within three days of receipt of the defective ballot, giving the voter the opportunity to fix it so it can be counted.

WHAT DO TURNOUT AND ADVANCE VOTE LOOK LIKE?
In 2018, 26% of voters cast early absentee/advance ballots. In 2020, advance voting jumped to 76%. Advance votes are reported with Election Day votes in a single report by the local clerk.

HOW LONG DOES COUNTING USUALLY TAKE?
As many as 99.6% to 100% of votes are counted election night by 2 a.m., the rest by Wednesday afternoon.

WHEN WILL WE KNOW THE RESULTS?
Vermont reports vote counts at the town or ward level rather than at the county level and provides only one report on election night.

That delays calling close races and races with multiple winners in state Senate races. It can also make some statewide races harder to call until there is enough representation throughout the state. Typically, reports begin to arrive by 7:15 pm ET and remain steady until late evening. Less than 1% of the count remains to be reported the following day and is usually done by early afternoon.



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