Breaking down the statewide proposals on New York’s Nov. 2 election ballot

New York

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Five proposals will appear on New York’s Nov. 2 election ballot. If voters approve a proposal by at least 50 percent, then it is added to the state constitution the following year in January.

Here is a breakdown of each proposal and how it will appear on the ballot.

Proposal One: Amending the Apportionment and Redistricting Process

Proposal One aims to amend the portions of Article 3 of the state constitution that relates to how district lines for congressional and state legislative offices are determined.

It would (1) Amend and repeal portions of the state constitutional amendment that previously created a redistricting commission; (2) Freeze the number of state senators at 63; (3) Require that state assembly and senate lines be based on total population and require the state to count all residents, including non-citizens and Native Americans if the federal census fails to include them; (4) Allow for the incarcerated population to be counted at their last place of residence rather than their place of incarceration; (5) Revise the procedure for drawing congressional and state legislative districts; (6) Remove certain restrictions on how senate district lines are drawn; and (7) Delete certain provisions that the U.S. Supreme Court has deemed unconstitutional.

How it will appear on the ballot:

“This proposed constitutional amendment would freeze the number of state senators at 63, amend the process for the counting of the state’s population, delete certain provisions that violate the United States Constitution, repeal and amend certain requirements for the appointment of the co-executive directors of the redistricting commission and amend the manner of drawing district lines for congressional and state legislative offices. Shall the proposed amendment be approved?”

Proposal Two: Right to Clean Air, Clean Water, and a Healthful Environment

Proposal Two aims to protect public health and the environment by adding the right of each person to clean air and water and a healthful environment to the Bill of Rights in Article 1 of the state constitution.

How it will appear on the ballot:

“The proposed amendment to Article 1 of the New York Constitution would establish the right of each person to clean air and water and a healthful environment. Shall the proposed amendment be approved?”

Proposal Three: Eliminating Ten-Day-Advance Voter Registration Requirement

Currently, the state constitution requires citizens be registered to vote at least 10 days before an election. Proposal Three would delete that requirement. If New Yorkers vote in favor of the proposal, the state legislature will enact laws that allow citizens to register to vote less than 10 days before an election.

How it will appear on the ballot:

“The proposed amendment would delete the current requirement in Article 2, § 5 that a citizen be registered to vote at least ten days before an election and would allow the Legislature to enact laws permitting a citizen to register to vote less than ten days before the election. Shall the proposed amendment be approved?”

Proposal Four: Authorizing No-Excuse Absentee Ballot Voting

Proposal Four would eliminate the need for a voter to provide a reason for voting by absentee ballot. Currently, the state constitution only allows absentee voting if (1) the voter expects to be absent from their county of residence or from New York City for city residents on Election Day, and (2) an illness or physical disability would prevent a voter from appearing at their polling location.

How it will appear on the ballot:

“The proposed amendment would delete from the current provision on absentee ballots the requirement that an absentee voter must be unable to appear at the polls by reason of absence from the county or illness or physical disability. Shall the proposed amendment be approved?”

Proposal Five: Increasing the Jurisdiction of the New York City Civil Court

Proposal Five would amend the state constitution to increase the jurisdiction of the New York City Civil Court. The court is currently limited to hearing and deciding claims for $25,000 or less. The proposal would allow the court to hear and decide claims for $50,000 or less.

How it will appear on the ballot:

“The proposed amendment would increase the New York City Civil Court’s jurisdiction by allowing it to hear and decide claims for up to $50,000 instead of the current jurisdictional limit of $25,000. Shall the proposed amendment be approved?”

Early voting is currently underway and ends on Oct. 31.

The last day to apply in-person for an absentee ballot is Nov. 1. The last day to postmark a ballot for the general election is Nov. 2. The last day to deliver an absentee ballot in-person to your Board of Elections is Nov. 2.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 2. Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

For more information, head to the New York State Elections website.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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