Trump’s 1-on-1 with Kim worries national security experts

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SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE – JUNE 11: U.S. President Donald Trump’s motorcade leaves the Istana presidential residence in Singapore on June 11, 2018 in Singapore. The historic meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has been scheduled for June 12 in Singapore as both leaders arrived in the Southeast Asian city-state on […]

For better part of an hour, President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will square off one on one, alone but for a pair of translators. That’s raising concerns about the risk of holding such a monumental meeting with barely anyone to bear witness.

Trump and Kim will meet on Singapore’s Sentosa Island for roughly 45 minutes while their entourages wait nearby.

The huddle will come before a larger meeting and a working lunch attended by top advisers to the president and their North Korean counterparts.

Word of the private meeting unleashed a torrent of criticism on social media from national security veterans who worry the lack of a transcript will create a he-said-he-said showdown that could turn into a major headache for Trump.

The White House says in a statement that the talks with North Korea are moving “more quickly than expected” and that Trump now plans to depart Singapore on Tuesday evening ahead of schedule.

The White House says Trump will address the media on Tuesday at approximately 8 p.m. local time for the United States. The president had been expected to leave Singapore on Wednesday morning.

Former U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry is warning that if Trump and Kim fail to reach a deal at their Singapore summit, there’s an increased danger for a “catastrophic” military solution.

Perry says, “If it falls apart, it’s probably worse than as if we ever started.”

Perry says he’s hopeful the two leaders will discuss normalization of ties as well as denuclearization to improve the prospect for long-term success of any deal.

He spoke Monday to The Associated Press at a Luxembourg Forum Conference on Preventing Nuclear Catastrophe event in Geneva.

Perry also served as President Bill Clinton’s special envoy to North Korea and traveled there in 1999 to discuss its nuclear and missile programs.

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